10 Bands You Must See At Indietracks 2016

2
indietracks 2016

Indietracks 2016 Runs From 29-31 July @ Midway Railway in Butterley, Derbyshire.

If Primavera is our favourite major festival, then Indietracks is definitely our favourite DIY festival. The indiepop mainstay is now in it’s tenth year of existence and it is without doubt that it gets stronger and stronger each year. This year they have around 50 pretty amazing acts ready to go. We’ve made a list of ten that you absolutely cannot miss below.

Outside of the music you should definitely also check out a bit of life coaching with Niall from The Spook School (he’s quite the character), the Indietracks 10th birthday disco, and their famous quiz.

Get your tickets right over here.

Subscribe to our weekly newsletter to receive the latest alternative music news, features, and reviews.

BONUS - Receive free 21 track MP3 compilation when you confirm your subscription.

10. The Spook School – Outdoor Stage 29 July (21:15 – 22.15)

This Edinburgh DIY indie punk quartet sing wonderful pop songs largely about gender. Their drummer, Niall McCamley has  wonderful moustache and they’re a great laugh live. Plus, they’re on Fortuna POP! and have a new EP called Continental Drift out on August 26th. All this means that they should be absolutely top of your list to see over the weekend.

Follow The Spook School on Facebook.

9. Nervous Twitch – Outdoor Stage 29 July (19:00 – 19:40)

Pop garage punk out of Leeds, these share a mutual love of the Ramones and 60s girl groups like the Ronettes. Their tracks are sharp and filled with melodies. Their second album Don’t Take My TV came out last February on the wonderful Odd Box Records. They’re known for their confident stage presence and lack of any sub par material. They should be your first stop when you arrive on Friday.

Follow Nervous Twitch on Facebook.

8. Flowers – Outdoor Stage 30 July (16:40 – 17:20)

This London trio play a kind of shoegaze pop. Basically, it’s quite spacey and fuzzy but the songs, at their core, a very delicate pop songs highlighted by Rachel Kenedy’s tender and beautiful vocals. They’ve had two albums out via Fortuna POP!, the most recent of which, Everybody’s Dying To Meet You, saw them build on the promise of their debut to create a fuller more accomplished sound. Don’t confused them the brass band from Gloucester of the same name. Totally different thing altogether.

Follow Flowers on Facebook.

7. Chrissy Barnacle – Church stage 30 July (14:20 – 15:00)

Singer songwriter from ‘the grimey shores of the Clyde’ in Scotland? Yes, please. Here we have writer whose work is yearning, weird, and hopeful. Like a Gaelic version of Kimya Dawson. These are delicate and honest lo-fi alt folk songs of the highest order. Head to see her for a bit of a respite from all the noisy guitar bands.

Follow Chrissy Barnacle on Facebook.

6. Witching Waves – Outdoor Stage 31 July (13:40 – 14:20)

A noisy post punk trio from London, Witching Waves music is pretty ramshackle and fuzzy. Expect lots of group vocals and harmonising. Their latest album Crystal Cafe came out last February via Soft Power Records, and adds a directness and focus that was perhaps lacking in their debut album. They’re on the afternoon of the last day. A good band to nurse that hangover to and get back into the swing of things with. Salut!

Follow Witching Waves on Facebook.

5. Trust Fund – Indoor Stage 31 July (18:00 – 18:40)

Bristol based lo-fi pop punk group consisting of loads of people but led by Ellis Jones, Trust Fund sing a somewhat rousing and somewhat twee style that seems to be wonderfully rooted in friendship and the DIY ethos. A ridiculously prolific project, they’ve released three albums since February 2015. I wouldn’t miss them if my pants were on fire and the extinguisher was clean on the other side of Derbyshire.

Follow Trust Fund on Facebook.

4. Saint Etienne – Outdoor Stage 30 July (21:00 – 22.15)

We shouldn’t really have to tell you about these, but here goes. Saint Etienne are a classic indie dance/indie pop group from London. They formed in 1990 and even their new music will make you feel like it’s about 1993. Which is always a good thing. Everyone and their mother loved their 2012 come back album Words and Music by Saint Etienne. It was their first in seven years but they picked up like they’d never been away. Headliners, which is hardly a surprise.

Follow Saint Etienne on Facebook.

3. Haiku Salut – Outdoor Stage 31 July (17:45 – 18:25)

Winners of Overblown’s favourite band name, Haiku Salut are a pretty joyous endeavour, playing electronica tinged with indie tropes. I believe they call it folktronica. I’m just joshing, I know what it’s called. It’s pretty beautiful with a touch of melancholia. Like a beautifully sunny day with one grey cloud in the corner. They released their wonderfully named second album Etch and Etch Deep last August. Twas a beauty and they promise to be a highlight. Without doubt.

Follow Haiku Salut on Facebook.

2. Two White Cranes – Church Stage 30 July (18:20 – 19:00)

Mainly a singer songwriter project of Roxy Brennan, Two White Cranes also features Dan Howard and Owen Williams of Joanna Gruesome fame. In fact Roxy sings in Joanna Gruesome now too. Great bands all round! Second album Radisson Blue came out late last year and it is a pretty lo-fi and reflective album. We especially love they manner in which Brennan delivers he vocals. There’s a wonderfully odd cadence to her delivery. Delightful.

Follow Two White Cranes on Facebook.

1. Comet Gain – Outdoor Stage 31 July (19:50 – 20:45)

There’s something about London garage punks Comet Gain that reminds me of Mudhoney or the Stooges. Can’t quite put the old finger on it. Could be the vocal delivery. Most likely the generally extremely garage vibe to the songs and solos. It’s all pretty snotty. They’ve been on the go since 1992 and released their seventh album, Paperback Ghosts, via Fortuna POP! in 2014. Make it your business to catch them.

Follow Comet Gain on Facebook.


If you like this list, you might enjoy our list of 18 Underrated 90s Alternative Rock Albums

Follow Overblown on Twitter.

  • John Greenfield

    “Twas”. Music journalism is still excrutiating shit then.

    • Jamie Coughlan

      What’s your issue with “twas”? Tis a perfectly cromulent word.