Tulipomania – ‘Don’t Be So Sure’ (Seahawks Remix) | Overblown Video Premiere

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Tulipomania
Photo by Edward Waisnis.

‘On the Outside / Don’t Be So Sure (Seahawks Remix)’ out September 15th.

A pensive and emotional track, the Seahawks remix of Tulipomania’s ‘Don’t Be So Sure’ is an ethereal beauty. Combining melancholic, swirling synths with delicate and vulnerable vocals, the track pulls at the listener with an insistent and consistent forlorn majesty that is a common feature on their most recent album This Gilded Age.

The Seahawks are comprised of the talented and experienced duo of Jon Tye and Pete Fowler. They’ll literally worked with everyone. Tye is the founder of the beyond legendary Lo Recordings. Their roster reads like a list of the most talented musicians in operation and includes Grimes, Aphex Twin, Four Tet, Thurston Moore and Astronauts. Meanwhile Fowler pioneered Monsterism vinyl toys and illustrated a number of the Super Furry Animals album sleeves.

Accompanying the song is a gorgeously animated video that is reminiscent of a Monet painting. If it moved that is. Apparently, “for the Seahawks remix, the band re-photographed the original artwork, frame by frame, matching the new tempo and softer mood, which they felt also called for a more painterly, layered approach to the imagery.” Definitely worth the effort.

Tulipomania have been described as many things. On top of obviously being flora lovers (I know that’s a terrible, terrible joke), their music has been called everything from chamber pop to post punk to art rock. Tom Murray (lead vocals, bass, drums) and Cheryl Gelover (synthesizer, background vocals) first met in art school. Tulipomania was born from their Experimental Film and Animation classes. As lovers of art and design they were honoured to work with legendary designer Vaughan Oliver on the artwork for their latest album This Gilded Age. It truly is beautiful.

Pre-order ‘On the Outside / Don’t Be so Sure (Seahawks Remix)’ via Bandcamp.

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